med_cat: (SH education never ends)
18 Science Facts We Didn't Know at The Start of 2017

...I must say, #1 is quite surprising:

1. Lungs don't just facilitate respiration - they also make blood. Mammalian lungs produce more than 10 million platelets (tiny blood cells) per hour, which equates to the majority of platelets circulating the body.
med_cat: (Stethoscope)
A measles case has been confirmed in Washington, DC

The Last Person You'd Expect to Die in Childbirth

The emerging and often drug-resistant fungus Candida auris continues to spread in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported today.

(the above two articles are from Medscape, free and quick registration required)

Court case highlights nurses' duty to follow EMTALA

When Nurses Make Fatal Mistakes

Support for the Second Victim: Caring for Our Own, from the American Association of Critical Care Nurses

(Support the Second Victim: Health professionals suffer distress after poor patient outcomes, even if no error occurred.)
~~

...and if anybody is interested in my comments about any of these, let me know, I'll share...:P ;)
med_cat: (dog and book)

Vaguebooking is any update on a social network (although primarily Facebook) that is intentionally vague. Status updates which fall under the category of vaguebooking can be long or short, but most comprise just a few simple words. Regardless of the length they all have one thing in common – to elicit a response from friends and followers.

While the majority of us will just be clear about something that has happened or why we’re upset, vaguebookers take great delight in beating around the metaphorical bush. Seeking attention while giving away as little as humanly possible.


Definition from the Urban Dictionary, and a few examples

A few more examples (you can even submit the ones you find)

Why it's usually not a good idea:

5 Reasons Vaguebooking is Destroying Your Relationships

The next time your friend posts a vague FB status, reply with this video

A slightly different perspective:

In Defense of Vaguebooking


(cross-posting from [livejournal.com profile] 1word1day)
med_cat: (woman reading)
A historical perspective on presidential elections, by Gene Weingarten; his April 23rd "Below the Beltway" column, from The Washington Post
med_cat: (cat in dress)
(The second link is hilarious...do take a look :P)

Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] browngirl at Science and Food
med_cat: (woman reading)
News and Politics:

Robert Reich: Republicans Are Afraid Trump Is Genuinely Nuts:
The former secretary of labor reflects on a Washington more divided and fearful than ever.

(thanks to [livejournal.com profile] elenbarathi)

The Westminster attack is a tragedy, but it’s not a threat to democracy, by Simon Jenkins

The terrorists’ aim is not just to kill a few but to terrify a multitude. For politicians and media to overreact would play into their hands.

(thanks to [livejournal.com profile] lindahoyland for this one)


Languages, History, and Literature:

15 Encouraging Spanish Phrases a Bilingual Spanish Speaker Would Like Everyone to Learn

The Coolest Things You Wish Were True About the Middle Ages

The Crows of Pearblossom, by Aldous Huxley--the only children's book he wrote. The illustrations are quite charming as well.
med_cat: (woman reading)
See below for excerpts; click article titles for full articles.

...Does anyone here know more about this cyclical theory of history? What do you think of it? This article presents a different opinion.

Cyclical models of history are something academics kick around every now and then, said Sean Wilentz, an American history professor at Princeton University. But the idea has not caught on among historians or political actors.

“It’s just a conceit. It’s a fiction, it’s all made up,” Wilentz said about cyclical historical models. “There’s nothing to them. They’re just inventions.”

Michael Lind, a historian and co-founder of the New America Foundation, a liberal think tank, has called Strauss and Howe’s work “pseudoscience” and said their “predictions about the American future turn out to be as vague as those of fortune cookies.”


~~~

President Trump wants to put on a show. Governing matters less.

Last spring, while reporting The Washington Post’s biography of Donald Trump, I asked an executive who had worked for Trump for more than three decades to help me understand a central contradiction about the man: How could he be at once the micromanager who in the 1980s would call an employee at 2 a.m. and order her out of bed to clean up litter he’d noticed in the lobby of one of his buildings, and also the boss who was so detached that he claimed to be ignorant of his hotels’ finances as they fell into bankruptcy?

The executive offered this guidance: “If you’re ever confused about Trump’s motives, go to showman first.” The building lobby was a showcase for the Trump brand, requiring the close attention of the man behind the name; the finances were backstage stuff, easily ignored.

Where did Steve Bannon get his worldview? From my book.

Beyond ideology, I think there’s another reason for the rising interest in our book. We reject the deep premise of modern Western historians that social time is either linear (continuous progress or decline) or chaotic (too complex to reveal any direction). Instead we adopt the insight of nearly all traditional societies: that social time is a recurring cycle in which events become meaningful only to the extent that they are what philosopher Mircea Eliade calls “reenactments.” In cyclical space, once you strip away the extraneous accidents and technology, you are left with only a limited number of social moods, which tend to recur in a fixed order.

Along this cycle, we can identify four “turnings” that each last about 20 years — the length of a generation. Think of these as recurring seasons, starting with spring and ending with winter. In every turning, a new generation is born and each older generation ages into its next phase of life.

The cycle begins with the First Turning, a “High” which comes after a crisis era. In a High, institutions are strong and individualism is weak. Society is confident about where it wants to go collectively, even if many feel stifled by the prevailing conformity. Many Americans alive today can recall the post-World War II American High (historian William O’Neill’s term), coinciding with the Truman, Eisenhower and Kennedy presidencies. Earlier examples are the post-Civil War Victorian High of industrial growth and stable families, and the post-Constitution High of Democratic Republicanism and Era of Good Feelings.

The Second Turning is an “Awakening,” when institutions are attacked in the name of higher principles and deeper values. Just when society is hitting its high tide of public progress, people suddenly tire of all the social discipline and want to recapture a sense of personal authenticity. Salvation by faith, not works, is the youth rallying cry. One such era was the Consciousness Revolution of the late 1960s and 1970s. Some historians call this America’s Fourth or Fifth Great Awakening, depending on whether they start the count in the 17th century with John Winthrop or the 18th century with Jonathan Edwards.

The Third Turning is an “Unraveling,” in many ways the opposite of the High. Institutions are weak and distrusted, while individualism is strong and flourishing. Third Turning decades such as the 1990s, the 1920s and the 1850s are notorious for their cynicism, bad manners and weak civic authority. Government typically shrinks, and speculative manias, when they occur, are delirious.

Finally, the Fourth Turning is a “Crisis” period. This is when our institutional life is reconstructed from the ground up, always in response to a perceived threat to the nation’s very survival. If history does not produce such an urgent threat, Fourth Turning leaders will invariably find one — and may even fabricate one — to mobilize collective action. Civic authority revives, and people and groups begin to pitch in as participants in a larger community. As these Promethean bursts of civic effort reach their resolution, Fourth Turnings refresh and redefine our national identity. The years 1945, 1865 and 1794 all capped eras constituting new “founding moments” in American history.

Just as a Second Turning reshapes our inner world (of values, culture and religion), a Fourth Turning reshapes our outer world (of politics, economy and empire)
med_cat: (woman reading)
For your amusement:

19 husbands who need it all spelled out

15 parents who have a perfect sense of humor (don't know about perfect, but some of them are quite funny)


Art and society:

Prepare to be amazed by these incredibly realistic sculptures

Beyond Objectification:
Norman Rockwell’s Depictions of Women for the Saturday Evening Post


No place for self-pity, no room for fear, by Toni Morrison, written in 2004, but just as relevant today, or at any other time:

"...None of this bodes well for the future. Still, I remember the shout of my friend that day after Christmas: No! This is precisely the time when artists go to work. There is no time for despair, no place for self-pity, no need for silence, no room for fear. We speak, we write, we do language. That is how civilizations heal.

I know the world is bruised and bleeding, and though it is important not to ignore its pain, it is also critical to refuse to succumb to its malevolence. Like failure, chaos contains information that can lead to knowledge—even wisdom. Like art."

Mental health:

An artist's depiction of what it's like to live with mental illness--the most striking one I've seen

Statistics: prevalence of mental illness among U.S. adults (17.9%, in other words, just slightly less than 1 in 5)
med_cat: (woman reading)
Geoffrey Chaucer hath a blog!

And Donaeld the Unready hath a Twitter account!

Check these out, do :)

Also, I love the name of the Twitter account; it reminded me of this...

"I suppose your ancestors often entertained royalty at Manderley, Mr. de Winter?"
[...]
"Not since Ethelred," he said, "the one who was called Unready. In fact, it was while staying with my family that the name was given him. He was invariably late for dinner."

Many thanks to [livejournal.com profile] supergee for the links.
med_cat: (cat in dress)

The last leader of the Soviet Union has a warning for the world: We may be on the brink of war.





~~
Mikhail Gorbachev: "The world is preparing for war", from NY Daily News

...Надо же, открыл Америку!!

:P

(offtopic--he's gotten so old...)
med_cat: (cat in dress)
Dippin' Dots Beef Puts White House Press Secretary On The Spot

...Really, he must not have had anything else to do, if he went to quarrel with Dippin' Dots, of all organizations!!

...and this person is the new White House press secretary? ...I'm sure we can expect many interesting statements from him, then...
med_cat: (cat in dress)
Why Our Partners Drive Us Mad: Philosopher Alain de Botton to the Central Foible of the Human Heart and How to Heal It, from Brain Pickings

The Erasure of Islam from Poetry of Rumi, by Rozina Ali, in The New Yorker

(makes sense...I did wonder why Rumi, unlike his sort-of-contemporary, also Muslim poet Mirza-Shafi, doesn't mention Islam...)

Gestures to Avoid in Cross-Cultural Business: In Other Words, ‘Keep Your Fingers to Yourself!’

11 WTF Items That Kids Ordered Online Without Telling Their Parents--I was especially amused by the mom's clever handling of #9

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